Monday, 1 August 2016

La Prière -A devout prayer of thanks for the bad and the good life brings




In "La Priere" we see Brassens once again putting to music the verses of a French Poet.  In this case, his choice of poet is surprising. Although Brassens held strongly anti- clerical views, he has chosen the religious poetry of  Francis Jammes.




The verses chosen by Brassens for his song, come from Jammes's collection of poems of 1906: "L'église habillée de feuilles"- (The Church clothed in leaves), reflecting the link that Jammes felt between religion and the rural lifestyle.

Some feel that this song shows Brassens regaining, at least temporarily, the Catholic faith of his childhood that had been instilled in him by his mother.  This question is discussed later in this post.








La Prière

Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
Tandis que des enfants s'amusent au parterre
Et par l'oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
Son aile tout à coup s'ensanglante et descend
Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent
Je vous salue, Marie.



Par les gosses battus, par l'ivrogne qui rentre
Par l'âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
Et par l'humiliation de l'innocent châtié
Par la vierge vendue qu'on a déshabillée
Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée
Je vous salue, Marie.



Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids
S'écrie: " Mon Dieu!" 
Par le malheureux dont les bras 
Ne purent s'appuyer sur une amour humaine
Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu'il traîne
Je vous salue, Marie.


Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde
Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe
Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains
Par le malade que l'on opère et qui geint
Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins
Je vous salue, Marie.


Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri
Par l'oiseau rappelant l'oiseau tombé du nid
Par l'herbe qui a soif et recueille l'ondée
Par le baiser perdu par l'amour redonné
Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie
Je vous salue, Marie.



From the album « Chanson pour l’auvergnat » (1955)
The Prayer 

For the small boy who’s dying pressed to his mother
While children are having fun in the yard outside
And for the wounded bird that does not know how
Its wing's all at once full of blood and drops down
For the hunger, thirst and the raging delirium
For these I Hail Mary.



For kids battered by a drunk back from his night out
For the ass which takes constant kicks to the belly
For the mortification of abused innocence
For the virgin sold off whom they have stripped naked
For the son whose mother has been grossly reviled
For these I Hail Mary.


For the old woman who staggers overloaded
And screams unto God! 
For the wretched man,whose arms
Could not turn for support on any human love
As the cross of the Son on Simon of Cyrene.
For the horse fallen under the cart that it drags
For these I Hail Mary.


For the four horizons that crucify the world
For all those whose flesh is torn or perishes
For all those without feet, for all those without hands
For the sick under surgery who groan with pain
And for the just man wrongly linked with murderers
For these I Hail Mary.


For the mother learning that her son is cured
For the bird calling back the bird slipped from  the nest
For the grass which is parched and gets swamped with the rain
For the kiss that was lost, returned by love
And for the beggar recovering his misplaced pennies.
For these I Hail Mary. 





The following shows that Brassens' song is a faithful copy of the text of Francis Jammes, but that  he made some adaptation of the order.


THIS IS THE TEXT OF GEORGES BRASSENS’ SONG

La prière


01Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
02Tandis que des enfants s'amusent au parterre
03Et par l'oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
04Son aile tout à coup s'ensanglante et descend
05Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent:
06Je vous salue, Marie



07Par les gosses battus par l'ivrogne qui rentre,
08Par l'âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
09Et par l'humiliation de l'innocent châtié,
10Par la vierge vendue qu'on a déshabillée,
11Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée:
12Je vous salue, Marie.

Brassens chose to omit this couplet "Crowning with thorns" from his song.

Within it Jammes talks of his personal torments as a poet, relating them to Christ's crown of thorns






13Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids,
14S'écrie : "mon Dieu ! ", par le malheureux dont les bras
15Ne purent s'appuyer sur une amour humaine
16Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
17Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu'il traîne:
18Je vous salue, Marie




19Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde,
20Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe,
21Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains,
22Par le malade que l'on opère et qui geint
23Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins:
24Je vous salue, Marie




THIS IS THE TEXT OF THE POEM OF FRANCIS JAMMES

Les cinq Mystères douloureux

Agonie
Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
tandis que des enfants s'amusent au parterre;
et par l'oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
son aile tout à coup s'ensanglante et descend;
par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent:
Je vous salue, Marie.


Flagellation
Par les gosses battus par l'ivrogne qui rentre,
par l'âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre,
par l'humiliation de l'innocent châtié,
par la vierge vendue qu'on a déshabillée,
par le fils dont la mère a été insultée:
Je vous salue, Marie


Couronnement d'épines
Par le mendiant qui n’eut jamais d’autre couronne
Que le vol des frelons, amis des vergers jaunes,
Et d’autre sceptre qu’un bâton contre les chiens ;
Par le poète dont saigne le front qui est ceint
Des ronces des désirs que jamais il n’atteint :
Je vous salue, Marie.

Portement de Croix.

Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids,
S'écrie : "Mon Dieu !" Par le malheureux dont les bras
Ne purent s'appuyer sur une amour humaine
Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène ;
Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu'il traîne
Je vous salue, Marie.


Crucifiement.

Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le Monde,
Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe,
Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains,
Par le malade que l'on opère et qui geint
Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins :
Je vous salue, Marie.



The final verse of Brassens’ song is not in fact the final verse of Jammes section: “Les cinq Mystères douloureux”. 

Brassens has taken this last optimistic verse from another section of  Jammes’ study of the mysteries of the Rosary, which is entitled : “Mystères Joyeux”




25Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri,
26Par l'oiseau rappelant l'oiseau tombé du nid,
27Par l'herbe qui a soif et recueille l'ondée,
28Par le baiser perdu par l'amour redonné,
29Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie :
30Je vous salue, Marie

Georges Brassens - 1955 - 
"Album  -Chanson pour l'auvergnat"
Invention de Notre Seigneur au Temple

Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri,
par l'oiseau rappelant l'oiseau tombé du nid,
par l'herbe qui a soif et recueille l'ondée,
par le baiser perdu par l'amour redonné,
et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie :
Je vous salue, Marie.

Francis Jammes - 1906 -




Francis Jammes (1868 -1938) came from the Pyrenees region of France and thus had Southern French roots, similar to Brassens.  Poetry writing had been his passion while he was still working in a solicitor's office.  His plain, lucid verse with country themes gained national recognition during the last decade of the 19th Century and by 1895 he was moving in Parisian literary circles that included Gide, Mallarmé and Henri de Régnier.  Successive collections of his poems, published between 1897 and 1901 were well received.  


The famous Catholic poet, Paul Claudel, became his close friend and under his influence, in 1905, Jammes became a practising Catholic once again, growing very devout.


CONTRASTING REACTIONS TO BRASSENS' SONG: "LA PRIERE"

Many people see in this song a sincere statement of the liturgy of the Christian and more particularly of the Catholic faith.  Some suggest that this is a moment when Brassens, the firm agnostic, experiences and appreciates briefly the Catholic faith in which his mother had brought him up.

The sincerity is certainly there and of necessity, because these are, as we see above, the exact words of Francis Jammes that he wrote when he was newly re-converted to Catholicism.

Inevitably as Brassens faithfully reproduced Jammes's poem there is religious content in Brassens' song.  Line 16  talks about "the cross of the Son".  A Christian understands that in bible usage "Son" means "The Son of Man" or "The Son of God". The mention of Simon of Cyrene in the same line, reminds Christians of the man who carried the cross of Jesus, when he had become too weak to carry it to his place of execution. 

The last line of each verse is: "Je vous salue Marie".  The English prayer is to end  "Hail Mary!"  (I am uncertain how to translate this as I like my English lines to have the same number of syllables).  Catholic commentators are impressed that this ending makes Brassens's song an authentic rosary prayer.

However Non-Christian, Non-Catholic readers will probably find  the actual religious and scriptural content in Brassens' song very light and not explicit.  An indication that this may have been Brassens' conscious intention is that he omitted the third verse of Jammes's poem, where Jammes gave details of Christ's crucifixion.

The question remains, however, why Brassens was attracted to the works of a Catholic poet. 

In fact, it is perhaps misleading to give Jammes this epithet is misleading.  He had built up his reputation as a poet of the people and ths "religious" poem is still predominantly about the wrongs suffered by the ordinary people about which Brassens was equally indignant

Other commentators have said that by using this last line invocation and by including the last verse, Brassens has introduced his personal satirical viewpoint.

Some critics maintain that Brassens is not merely being neutral to religion in this song, but that he is subtly putting over his own religious viewpoint.  In their view, by transposing the final verse from a different section,  Brassens is pointing out that life does not consist only of the tragedy and disillusionment described in the first four stanzas. The fifth stanza tells us that there is also happiness and good luck. In this world of alternative possible outcomes the question is then posed why the deity who, people of religious faith believe, direct our lives, allow the cruel, destructive outcomes to be inflicted on humankind. One conclusion must be that the deity is ineffective or even indifferent in the face of the evident wrongs and the cruelties suffered by the creatures of the earth.

With this realisation,the final invocation of each verse: "Je vous salue Marie" would become purely ironical.

A poem means very different things to different people.  Those who describe in their comments under the You Tube recording the deep religious emotion that the song makes them feel are equally authentic.

A TECHNICAL REASON WHY BRASSENS CHOSE THIS POEM

In song writing , there is a tradition of devising basic melodies that can be be used in multiple songs. In 19 th Century France, these all purpose melodies on which people stuck their own words were called "Timbres".  In the previous year, Brassens had put to song the poem of Aragon "Il n'y a pas d'amour heureux".  This poem had the 12 syllable line of the Alexandrine.

In putting the alexandrines of Jammes to music, Brassens decided to experiment with the "timbre" method and put "Les cinq Mysteres douleureux" onto his previous melody. Brassens tells how he got the reaction:"Who is this lazy chap who puts two different songs on the same tune?"

Brassens never used this technique again.



Please click here to return to the alphabetical list of my Brassens selection

Like many of peasant stock, Jammes had a great love of and respect for his donkeys, which he expressed tenderly in the following poem:  "Prière pour aller au Paradis avec les ânes" (Prayer to go to paradise with the  donkeys)






Prière pour aller au Paradis avec les ânes
by

Francis Jammes


Lorsqu'il faudra aller vers vous, ô mon Dieu, faites
que ce soit par un jour où la campagne en fête poudroiera. Je désire, ainsi que je fis ici-bas, choisir un chemin pour aller, comme il me plaira, au Paradis, où sont en plein jour les étoiles.


Je prendrai mon bâton et sur la grande route j'irai, et je dirai aux ânes, mes amis:
Je suis Francis Jammes et je vais au Paradis,
car il n'y a pas d'enfer au pays du Bon Dieu.
Je leur dirai: Venez, doux amis du ciel bleu,
pauvres bêtes chéries qui, d'un brusque mouvement d'oreille,
chassez les mouches plates, les coups et les abeilles...

Que je vous apparaisse au milieu de ces bêtes
que j'aime tant parce qu'elles baissent la tête
doucement, et s'arrêtent en joignant leurs petits pieds
d'une façon bien douce et qui vous fait pitié.


J'arriverai suivi de leurs milliers d'oreilles,
suivi de ceux qui portèrent au flanc des corbeilles,
de ceux traînant des voitures de saltimbanques
ou des voitures de plumeaux et de fer-blanc,
de ceux qui ont au dos des bidons bossués,
des ânesses pleines comme des outres, aux pas cassés,
de ceux à qui l'on met de petits pantalons
à cause des plaies bleues et suintantes que font 
les mouches entêtées qui s'y groupent en ronds.


Mon Dieu, faites qu'avec ces ânes je vous vienne.
Faites que dans la paix, des anges nous conduisent
vers des ruisseaux touffus où tremblent des cerises
lisses comme la chair qui rit des jeunes filles,
et faites que, penché dans ce séjour des âmes,
sur vos divines eaux, je sois pareil aux ânes
qui mireront leur humble et douce pauvreté
à la limpidité de l'amour éternel.


When I have to go to meet you, O my God, grant
That it is on a holiday when the landscape
Will shimmer.   I want, just as I did here below,
To choose a way to my liking, to get
To Paradise, where stars shine in full light of day.

I will take my stick and along the main highway
I will go and I will tell my friends the donkeys:
I am Francis Jammes and I’m off  to Paradise,
For there is no hell in the land of the good Lord. I'll say to them: Come, sweet friends of the blue heaven,
Poor much love beasts who with quick flick  of the ear
Brush off the flies, the bees and the blows aimed for them...

May I appear before you amidst these creatures Whom I love so much because they bow down their heads
Gently and come to a stop by joining their small feet
In manner most sweet, and which moves you to pity.



I'll arrive followed by their thousands of ears, 
Followed by those who carried baskets on each side
by those pulling the wagons of travelling fair folk
or carts of feather dusters and things made of tin,
by those who have on their backs churns full of dinges,
By she-asses pregnant as if bursting, dawdling,
By those on whom they have put little pantaloons
Because of the open blue wounds which are made by
The stubborn flies that circle around them in swarms.


God, grant that I may come to you with these donkeys.
Grant that thy angels may peaceably conduct us
To streams lined with bushes upon which cherries sway ,
Just as smooth as the pleasurable flesh of  girls,
And grant that I, in this rest place for souls, gazing
Over your divine waters, may be like the donkeys
Whose humble and sweet poverty will be mirrored
In the manifestation of love eternal.



A PERSONAL COMMENT - PET ANIMALS AND PERFECT LOVE.


My friends are for the most part not over-enthusiastic about ideas of an afterlife. Among them, however, there are quite a few who harbour a hope that, some time after death, they may come to a place where a faithful old cat or dog has been lying waiting for them all the intervening years.





FINAL FOOTNOTE
Some commentators claim that it was Brassens who wrote the final couplet of "La Priere".  They are wrong and the last verse of the following is the evidence:


Les Mystères joyeux -Francis Jammes

Annonciation
Par l'arc-en-ciel sur l'averse des roses blanches,
Par le jeune frisson qui court de branche en branche, 
Et qui a fait fleurir la tige de Jessé ; 
Par les Annonciations riant dans les rosées 
Et par les cils baissés des graves fiancées Je vous salue, Marie.

L'exaltation
Par l'exaltation de votre humilité
Et par la joie du coeur des humbles visités, 
Par le Magnificat qu'entonnent mille nids,
Par les lys de vos bras joints vers le saint-esprit 
Et par Elisabeth, treille où frémit un fruit 
Je vous salue, Marie.

Nativité
Par l'âne et par le boeuf, par l'ombre et par la paille, 
Par la pauvresse à qui l'on dit qu'elle s'en aille, 
Par les nativités qui n'eurent sur leurs tombes
Que les bouquets de givre aux plumes de colombes ; 
Par la vertu qui lutte et celle qui succombe 
Je vous salue, Marie.

Purification
Par votre modestie offrant des tourterelles, 
Par le vieux Siméon pleurant devant l'autel,
Par la prophétesse Anne et par votre mère Anne, 
Par l'obscur charpentier qui, courbé sur sa canne, 
Suivait avec douceur les petits pas de l'âne 
Je vous salue, Marie.

Invention de Notre Seigneur au Temple (Brassens' last verse)

Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri, 
Par l'oiseau rappelant l'oiseau tombé du nid. 
Par l'herbe qui a soif, et recueille l'ondée ; 
Par le baiser perdu, par l'amour redonné. 
Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie 
Je vous salue, Marie.


No comments:

Post a Comment